Welcome to H-NIP

The Howard University College of Medicine will integrate the National HIV Curriculum (NHC) e-Learning Platform into the education and training curricula of 28 medical, nursing, pharmacy and other health profession programs (HPP) including graduate education/residency programs located at 14 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). The overarching goal of the project is to expand the HIV clinical workforce by increasing the number of health professional graduates who receive specialized training in the care and management of persons living with HIV/AIDS.

The H-NIP team will develop six courses based on the NHC and offer them as electives to HBCU HPP students in Year 1 of the project while training HBCU HPP staff to offer the NHC courses themselves starting in Year 2 of the project and providing technical assistance to the institutions so that they develop the technological infrastructure to support the NHC e-learning platform. At the conclusion of the project each participating HPP will have integrated the NHC into its health curriculum as a mandatory requirement and 1,964 health professions students will be trained annually on the NHC.

HIV/AIDS awareness

Our Mission

Since HIV medicine is not taught in many health professions academic or training programs, it is generally not required by school accrediting agencies. This project will help increase the number of well-trained HIV clinicians in the U.S while simultaneously addressing the national shortages in the HIV clinical workforce.

 

 

Program Leadership

The Howard University National HIV Curriculum Integration Project (H-NIP) is housed in the Collegeof Medicine. Dr. Goulda Downer, Associate Professor in the College of Medicine and Director for the project, shares that this targeted HBCU population has been specifically selected for the following reasons – HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts persons of color, particularly African Americans.

Furthermore, people of color are more likely to live in medically underserved areas and prefer being treated by providers of color. Also, the majority of physicians of color are more likely to work in medically underserved areas and treat racial/ethnic minorities than non-minority physicians. Among Black physicians currently in practice, the majority receive their training from a historically black college or university (HBCU).

Image of doctor

Meaningful Impact

On September 1, 2018, Howard University College of Medicine was awarded a $600,000 annual cooperative agreement from Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) totaling $2,400,000 over four years. The purpose of the award is to integrate the National HIV Curriculum (NHC) e-Learning Platform into the education and training curricula of health professions programs. These programs include medical, nursing, pharmacy and other health profession programs (HPPs) including graduate education/ residency programs. The programs selected for this project are all located in Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

 

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Our quarterly newsletter covers H-NIP updates and insights